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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Board of Higher Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 

FIFTY - SEVENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1973 -June 30, 1974 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



THE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 



Secretary of Education Affairs 
Dr. Joseph H„ Cronin 



Chancellor 
Patrick E. McCarthy 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

Main Office 



BOSTON 

02108 

Tel: 227-0719 



Room 208, Tremont Bldg. 

73 Tremont Street 

Acting Supervisor of Social Service 

Miss Carolyn D. Jackym 



Branch Offices 



FALL RIVER 

02720 

Tel: 672-7762 



51 Franklin Street 

Daniel J. Donahue, District Agent 



LAWRENCE 

01840 

Tel: 682-2877 



Rooms 308-309 

Blakeley Bldg. , 477 Essex Street 

Andrew W. Ansara, District Agent 



SPRINGFIELD 

01103 

Tel: 734-1018 



State Office Bldg. 

235 Chestnut Street 

John A . Mclnnes, District Agent 



WORCESTER 

01608 

Tel: 755-6815 



Rooms 401-402, Park Bldg. 

507 Main Street 

Edmund B. Meduski, District Agent 



Publication #8081 approved by Alfred C. Holland 

State Purchasing Agent 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofdi1974mass 



ANNUAL REPORT 
July 1, 1973 - June 30, 1974 



The Division of Immigration and Americanization 
completed its fifty-seventh year of service in ful- 
filling its function to bring into sympathetic and 
mutually helpful relations the Commonwealth and its 
residents of foreign origin. The Boston office and 
district offices (Fall River, Worcester, Springfield, 
and Lawrence) rendered a combined total of 41,658 
services, to 20,423 individuals. 

There was no action on the reorganization bill 
H.6160 filed in the Massachusetts legislature in 
1973. It will be recalled, one of its provisions was 
to abolish this Division. 

The Division will, in the very near future, 
provide employment and educational counselling to 
aliens under the direction of Dr. Joseph M. Cronin, 
Secretary of Educational Affairs and Richard H. Hailer, 
Assistant Secretary, as well as to take part in the 
effort to coordinate the ethnic heritage activities 
amongst the Bilingual-Bicultural program, Arts and 
Humanities Council, and community ethnic organizations. 
Senator Schweiker (R-Pa.) original sponsor of the 
Ethnic Heritage Studies Program, announced recently 
that the program has won a 4-year extension. It is 
anticipated there will be a broad spectrum of ethni- 
cally diverse activities and the Division will partici- 
pate and cooperate with multiethnic projects. The 
Honorable Francis W. Sargent, Governor of Massachusetts, 
recently signed an Executive Order establishing a Task 
Force to make recommendations for enhancing the "ex- 
istence and development of ethnic heritage programs, 
and achievements in the Commonwealth and elsewhere", 
in recognition of group identities in our pluralistic 
society. There is a resurgence of the unmel table 
ethnics in the nation and their undeniable contributions 
to the nation are coming to the fore. 

Ethnic Classifications 

Our clients show 103 countries of birth for this 
fiscal year. Of those numbering over 1,000 the 
Portuguese lead the ethnic classification with 4932; 
Greece - 3695; United States - 3153; Italy - 2568; 
Poland - 2191; the Dominican Republic - 2141; Canada - 
2014, Cuba - 1997, Jamaica - 1759 and China - 1152. 
However on the national level, the largest ethnic 
groups over 10,000 for fiscal year 19 73, show the 



following: Mexico. - 70,141; Philippines - 30,799; 
Cuba - 24,147; Korea - 22,930; Italy - 22,151; China 
and Taiwan - 17,297; Dominican Republic - 13, 921; 
India - 13,124; Greece - 10,751; Portugal - 10,060; 
United Kingdom - 10, 6 38 „ 

12,484 immigrants were destined to Massachusetts 
during fiscal year, 1973 and to other states as follows: 



New York 

California 

Illinois 



93,626 
85,062 
25,489 



New Jersey 25,236 
Texas 26,619 
Florida 22,117 



Under the alien Registration Act, in January 1974, 
180,531 aliens registered in Massachusetts. During 
the fiscal year 1973, 4,127,821 permanent residents 
reported under the Alien Address Program in the nation. 
The largest single alien groups were: Mexicans - 
837,865; Cubans - 456,056; Canadians - 444,308, British 
- 330,378; Italians - 235, 703; Germans - 198,577; 
Filipinos - 193,271; Chinese -.125,155. 

On the national level for fiscal year, 1973, 166,108 
new immigrants were admitted to the United States from 
the Eastern Hemisphere and 116,903 from the Western 
Hemisphere. These figures do not include the 100,953 
immigrants classified as "immediate relatives" , that is, 
spouses, children and parents of United States citizens 
and embraces both the Eastern and Western Hemisphere. 

According to the census records, the population of 
Massachusetts is 5,688,903 and 494,680 are listed as 
foreign born. 1,397,064 are either foreign born or of 
mixed parentage so that one-third of the residents of 
Massachusetts have foreign backgrounds. 



Legislation in Congress 



H.R. 981, provides, amongst other things, that the 
Eastern and Western Hemisphere immigration systems 
(quotas) be equalized. H.R. 982 is a bill to impose 
sanctions on employers who knowingly employ aliens out 
of status. Both bills were filed by Rep. Peter Rodino 
and are now pending in the Senate judiciary committee. 
H.R. 981 is aimed at adjusting the quota - the Eastern 
Hemisphere (natives of Europe, Asia, Africa and Oceania) 
has a seven preference quota system and a nonpreference 
classification. The Western Hemisphere (Canada, Mexico, 
South and Central America, and most of the islands in 
the Caribbean) has no such preferences, and frequently a 
Western Hemisphere native who would return to his country 



to marry, has to wait for his spouse over two years. 
Another bill in Congress is S.2643 introduced by 
Senator Kennedy, in 1973. It provides amongst 
other things, for the quota system to be equalized 
(Eastern and VJestern Hemisphere), and to make provision 
to adjust the status of aliens in the United States 
over three years in an illegal status. It is estimated 
there are over six million such persons in the United 
States. Canada appears to have a similar problem and 
is contemplating an "amnesty" to take care of such 
aliens. In this country also, we have had a Chinese 
confession program as far back as the 1950s, to 
encourage adjustment of status and provide administrative 
relief for aliens in the United States, who have over 
a period of years, settled here, had children born in 
this country and in many instances, had acquired 
property or a modest business, supporting their families. 
All the above bills are still pending in the 93rd 
Congress. 

Refugees 

The Division assisted 293 Cubans in adjusting 
their status, after arriving here under "parole" status, 
at least two years ago. The Cuban airlift program 
terminated in May, 19 72. However, the program has been 
expanded to include Cubans from Spain, as many sought 
refuge in that country, since they were unable to enter 
the United States otherwise. Added to the waves of 
refugees from other countries, are Soviet Jews, and 
other members of Soviet minorities, paroled by the 
Attorney General into the United States, as well as 
Uganda Asians. Since World War II, to fiscal year 1973, 
1,004,543 refugees were admitted to the United States. 
The largest number of refugees came from Cuba - 189,282; 
the next largest from Poland - 164,494, Other large 
numbers came from Germany - 100,224; Yugoslavia - 
80,316; Hungary - 67,869; Italy - 62,684; and U.S.S.R. , 
45,353. 



Citizenship 

Citizenship applications continue on a high level 
with over 126,000 persons naturalized by the Federal 
and State courts in the nation, the highest number in 
the past ten years. The children, likewise, who derive 
citizenship through their parents, are issued citizen- 
ship certificates. 32,829 children obtained such 
certificates. Our Division assisted 2,057 persons with 
citizenship applications. To a great extent, people 
may be motivated in applying for citizenship to obtain 



certain immigration benefits. A citizen of the 
United States may petition for his spouse, child or 
parents, according them an immediate relative non- 
quota status, thus eliminating quota restrictions 
and long waiting periods. Families are reunited 
much quicker, as usually the head of the family 
emigrates first, to try and establish himself, before 
sending for his family. 

The Division assisted 640 persons in changing 
their status from visitors, students, or other non- 
immigrant categories, to permanent residents. Some 
were qualified to adjust their status before the 
federal immigration service in Boston; others, natives 
of Western Hemisphere, had immigrant visa applications, 
accepted by American Consuls abroad - a great deal of 
them at the American Consulate, Halifax, N.S., Canada. 
This involved preparing the visa documents, translations, 
and correspondence with American Consuls, before the 
applicant was given a visa appointment by the American 
Consul. 

The Division continues to serve aliens and American 
citizens, cooperating with federal, public, and private 
agencies, schools, colleges, and industry. Foreign 
students from many parts of the world frequently call 
on the Division for assistance in immigration problems. 
The clergy also seek our assistance in sponsoring priests 
from abroad, to carry on their religious work here as 
do many convents sponsoring nuns from abroad, or help 
adjust the status of some already in this country. 



REPORTS OF DIS TRIC T OFFICES 

SPRINGFIELD 



Our statistics indicate that 3,199 recorded 
services were performed, for individuals who resided 
in four Western Counties : of the State. These 
people came to us from forty-six communities in the 
area served in our office. We had contact with forty- 
nine former residents now living in other areas of 
our country. 

Of the seventy-seven nationalities recorded this 
year, natives of the United States were the leading 
group followed by natives of Jamaica, Canada, Greece, 
Poland, Korea, Portugal, Germany and Great Britain. 
It is to be noted that over a thousand of our clients 
were natives of the western Hemisphere. 

As mentioned at the close of the fiscal year of 
1973, our agency was greatly concerned and involved 
in the Reorganization Program of the Board of Higher 
Education which recommended that this Division be 
abolished. On August 2, 19 73, this agent appeared at 
a public hearing at the University of. .Massachusetts 
and before the Legislative Committee on Education to 
register opposition to the proposal to abolish our 
agency under H. 6160. It can now be reported that the 
Legislature did not deem it advisable to discontinue 
the work of our Division. 

The major portion of our work was devoted to the 
subject of Immigration. To those persons whose rela- 
tives required labor clearance, it is disheartening 
as jobs are unavailable. For these who have relatives 
in the Western Hemisphere, it was found discouraging, 
because although they may have been able to obtain 
the job certification, they were greatly disturbed upon 
learing that visas would not be available for twenty- 
eight to twenty-nine months. The majority expressed 
hope that the Congress may soon make a change in the 
preference system applicable to the Western Hemisphere. 

Iiost of our adjustment cases dealt with the so- 
called overstays. These non- immigrants were natives 
of the Western Hemisphere who were admitted to the 
United States two or three years ago either as visi- 
tors or students. They had failed to extend their 
temporary stay in the United States. All of these 
cases were directed to us by the United States Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service after they had been 
placed under Docket Control. 



The handling of these cases is quite involved 
and time consuming for it generally requires several 
steps to be taken over a period of several months 
before the individual receives an invitation to appear 
before the appropriate United States Consulate abroad. 

During the year we had numerous inquiries from 
United States Citizens, native and naturalized, inter- 
ested in learning the requirements for moving to and 
taking up residence in Canada. Some of them openly 
expressed discontent with the general condition that 
presently exists in the United States, such as crime, 
violence, and unemployment. Others, particularly 
former natives of Canada, believed that because of the 
present economic conditions here, they may be able 
financially to maintain themselves in Canada on their 
limited retirement income. 

We continue to receive full cooperation from the 
numerous public and private agencies, schools, colleges, 
etc. The prompt and courteous assistance we receive 
both from the local United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service Office and the District Di- 
rector's Office in Boston is commendable and has 
greatly benefited us as well as the people we serve. 



WORCESTER OFFICE 

Ue had another banner year providing 5,893 services 
for a clientele of 3,473. The Agent had an average 
of 500 services a month from January 31, 1974, after 
clerical assistant, Miss C. Elizabeth Esposito, retired 
after forty- three years in the Division's Worcester 
office. Numerous people called her work "a labor of 
love", especially the ones that she assisted for 
decades, dating back to 1930. Her devotion to duty 
motivated her to such an extent, that she did not use 
close to 400 sick days. The Division and the public 
recognized these facts, about a career state employee. 

Central Massachusetts has the same trend as 
mentioned in national publications, how America's melt- 
ing pot of immigrant cultures has received a big dash 
of Asian flavoring since 1965 when America's new, 
liberalized immigration law went into effect. Immi- 
grants from India lead the new wave, along with Korea 
and the Philippines, .being mostly highly skilled and 
professional people, physicians, psychiatrists, 
scientists and engineers. We have numerous dealings 
with them, as well as, the sponsoring hospitals and 
research institutions, such as, the world renown 
Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology. 



Another trend is an increase of non-immigrant 
students from both hemispheres to the Worcester 
Public School System, since April 1962, when they 
registered with the United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service to accept foreign students. 
There also has been a marked increase in permanent 
resident students, especially Spanish speaking. 

There are a number of well known higher insti- 
tutions of learning in the area, which enroll students 
from all over the world, as well as employing teachers 
on their staffs. We have inquiries from Assumption 
College, Becker Junior College, Clark University, 
Holy Cross College, Worcester Junior College, Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute, and Worcester State College. 
Being certified as a teacher in Massachusetts in April 
1953, and attending four of the colleges helps this 
agent in assisting and guiding these students, as well 
as gaining instant rapport. 



FALL RIVER OFFICE 

During the past fiscal year ending June 30, 1974, 
the Fall River Office totaled 5,116 services. These 
services were issued to 2,158 individuals located in 
the Southeastern Massachusetts area. 

Fifty-four countries were represented by clients 
seeking assistance at the Fall River Office. The 
greater number of persons visiting this office were 
people of Portuguese ethnic background and constituted 
almost 75% of the work involved at this office. The 
next ethnic groups were natives and citizens of the 
Philippines, China and Poland, in that order. 

Clients from twenty-six separate localities called 
at this office for services. There are numerous foreign 
students in the Southeastern Massachusetts area attend- 
ing Southeastern Mass. University and Bristol Community 
College. These students represent the countries of 
South America, Ceylon, Africa, Egypt and India, from 
which countries, years ago, there was little or no 
immigration in this area. 

The services most frequently given during the 
past fiscal year involved questions and answers con- 
cerning United States citizenship and requests for 
information and advice for individuals who are anxious 
to bring relatives, friends and students to the 
United Statue from other countries. Many letters were 
written on behalf of clients by this office to United 
States Consulates abroad and to government agencies 
within this country. 



The immigration statistics remain stable, how- 
ever, there is not the great influx of new arrivals 
that occurred in the late 1960's and early 1970 »s. 

The bulk of the work during the past fiscal 
year was that of clients applying for United States 
citizenship. It is the largest number of citizenship 
applications forwarded to the Federal Immigration and 
Naturalization Service at Boston by this District. 

It is evident that citizenship and immigration 
are still important factors in the Fall River area, 
the Commonwealth as well as the rest of the nation. 



LAWRENCE OFFICE 

Fiscal year ending June 30, 19 74 proved to be 
the busiest year of the Lawrence office in the memory 
of this Agent. We gave 8,553 services to 5,235 indi- 
viduals. This was an increase of 626 services over 
last year's previous high of 7,827. 

The service most frequently rendered dealt with 
immigration information. With the complexity of our 
immigration laws, much of our time was spent explain- 
ing the various aspects, many of which are incongruous 
and at times, even absurd. ,.For example, we had a 
newly arrived resident alien who wanted to bring his 
wife and his unmarried son and daughter to the United 
States. The son, twenty-five years of age, was born in 
Portugal. The daughter, age twenty- three, was born in 
Brazil, after the family moved there. We advised the 
gentleman that he could petition for his wife and son, 
but could not do so for his daughter because she came 
under the Western Hemisphere numerical limitation. The 
look of bewilderment that crossed this man's face was 
something never to be forgotten. We mentioned the 
possibility of a labor certification for her, but ex- 
plained that she would first have to be sponsored by 
an employer who had need for her skills. Then, after 
the papers were certified by the Labor Department 
(which happens in only about 50 percent of the appli- 
cations submitted) there would be a waiting period of 
over two years before the Consul could even begin 
processing her papers. The fallacy in this procedure 
lies in the fact that no employer is going to wait 2% 
years for a prospective employee. The man explained 
sadly that his daughter has lived at home all her life 
and has never had any work experience. He finally 
decided to send only for his son, since his wife would 
not want to leave her daughter alone. Meanwhile, this 
family is separated and the man and his son are work- 
ing to support two homes. We read somewhere that our 
laws are set up to prevent the separation of families t 



This Agent has been working in Lowell one day 
a week. The work in that city increased tremendously 
during the past year so arrangements were made to 
increase the Lowell visits by ^-day. It is hoped 
that some day a full-time office will be established 
in Lowell because there is sufficient work there to 
warrant it. 

We have the cooperation of the Federal Agencies, 
public and private agencies, schools, colleges, and 
industry as well as individuals from all walks of life 
and hope to continue to serve them. 



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STATISTICAL DETAIL 
Service Given 





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FISCAL YEAR 7/1/73 - 6/30/74 



OFFICES - ALL OFFICES 



INFO RMAT ION 


3528 


2272 


4231 


1948 


3041 


15020 


Booklets, Forme, Blanks 


670 


756 


116 


217 


314 


2073 


Citizenship 


188 


836 


720 


617 


779 


3090 


Immigration 


2627 


511 


3187 


895 


1354 


8574 


Travel 


42 


11 


166 


177 


594 


990 


Others 


51 


158 


42 


42 


— 


293 








2198 


598 


1577 








1606 




APFLl CAT IONS 


6334 


12313 



Change of Address (AR-11 ) 91 

Biographic Data (DSP-70) 147 

Visa Reg. (FS-497 & 497A) 64 

Imm. Visa Application (FS-510) 138 
Rep. Reg. (G-28) 222 



18 



15 



43 



16 



57 



10 



8 



18 



13 



75 



8 



55 



Alien Reg. (1-53) 

Dup. Alien Reg Card (1-90) 

Pet. to Classify Status of 

Fiancee (I-129F) 
Relative Petition (I-130)_ 
Re-entry Permit (I-131_r 
Skilled Labor Pet. (1-140) 



48 



43 



372 



120 



245 



40 



156 



205 



87 



183 



52 



95 



25 



16 



8 



14 



912 



107 



253 



77 



223 



56 



10 



83 



15 



Foreign Police Clear. (1-484) 68" 

Registry for Citz (1-485) 1 

Permanent Res. (Sec. 245J 291 

Cuban Adjustment (I-485A) 216 



14 



57 



56 



15 



56 



Temp Change of Status (1-506) 43 
Ext. Visitor Stay (1-539) 338 



68 



23 



31 



474 



Veri. of Legal Entry ( 1-550 )_ 

Refugee-Escapee Ass. (1-591) 3T 

Petition Under Orphan Act (1-600) 5 
Other Imm. Forms 127 



97 



218 



24 



212 



8 



102 



17 



12 



11 



Decl. of Intention (N-300) 75_ 

Pet. for Naturalization (N4400) 815 
Pet. Nat'l of Child (N-402) 36 



24 



56 



19 



16 



10 



23 



420 



229 



92 



Veri. of Military Serv. (N-426) 

Dup. Certificate (N-565) 

Info, from Records (N-585) 

Deri. Cert, Appli. (N-600) 

Other Naturalization Forms 

Biographic Inf. (G-325-325A) 

Mil. Biographic (G-325B) [ 

Labor Clearance (MA7-50 



41 



14 



11 



8 



17 



10 



14 



11 



8 



73 



13 



83 



15 



30 



19 



25 



13 



12 



1212 



471 



356 107 



324 



16 



17 



A & B 



18 



183 



222 
96 



231 

368 



933 
622 



70 



182 1531 



379 
25 



84 



8 



475 



293 



104 



889 



613 



19 



242 



120 



220 1776 



109 



14 



60 



100 



172 



30 



2470 



43 



29 



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EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVIT 


1919 


177 


536 


222 


533 


3387 


Affidavit of Support 


1606 


95 


359 


93 


347 


2500 


Affidavit of Facts 


5 


2 


.101 


1 


5 


120 


U.S.S.R. Russian Assurances 


33 


— 


9 


— 


11 


53 


Polish Assurances 


91 


11 


29 


— 


84 


215 


Other Notarials 


184 


69 


38 


122 


86 


499 


OTHER SERVICES 


6531 


563 


1463 


237 


462 


9256 


Change of Status 


501 


44 


— 


24 


71. 


640 


Appearance at Hearings 


47 


11 


— 


— 


— 


58 


Interpretation & Translation 


1044 


12 


104 


— 


50 


1210 


Letters 


4937 


471 


1319 


208 


341 


7276 


Others 


2 


25 


40 


5 


. — 


72 



NEWCOMER RESPONSE 



585 



498 



125 



194 



280 



1682 



TOTALS 



18,897 



5,116 8,553' 3,199 5,893 



41,658 



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BOSTON 



SPRING 
FALL RIVER LAWRENCE FIELD WORCESTER TOTAL 



ETHNIC AND NATIONALITY STATISTICS 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 

lie 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

IS. 

19. 

20. 

?1 

22. 

23. 

24. 

25. 

26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 

30. 

31. 

32. 

33. 

34. 

35. 

36. 

37. 

38. 

39. 

40. 

41. 

42. 

43. 

44. 

45. 

46. 

47. 

48. 

49. 

50. 

51. 

52. 

53. 



Albania^ 
Algeria^ 
Antigua 
Arabia 



30 



53 



83 



46 



Argentin a 113 

Armenia 

Aruba 



16 



China 

Colombia 
Costa Ric 
Cuba 



789 



669 



a 28 3 
1157" 



Cyprus_ 
Czech. _ 
Denzig 



26 



10 



32 



52 



_4 

JL 6 
if 



144 



140 



43 



37 



14 



122 



74 



102 



22 



13 



27 



44 



653 



35 



108 



8 



40 



48 



5_ 
136 



146 



Australia 


12 


— 


8 


7 


12 


39 


Austria 


7 


8 


— 


9 


6 


30 


Bahamas 


6 


— 


— 


3 


— 


9 


Barbados 


384 


— 


2 


58 


19 


463 


Belgium 


2 


5 


2 


4 


5 
19 


18 


Bermuda 


4 


16 


— 


9 


48 


Bolivia 


26 


— 


5 


1 


— 


32 


Brazil 


121 


53 


167 


1 


12 


359 


Guiana 


11 


— 


— 


— 


6 


17 


Bulgaria 


12 


— 


10 


25 


1 


48 


Canada 


355 


128 


883 


268 


380 


2014 


Ceylon 


- - 


11 


7 


— 


2 


20 


Chile 


94 


6 


27 


_ 


8 


135 



1152 



981 



345 



1997 



12 



83 



Denmark 


19 


— 


— 


— 


4 


23 


Dom . Rep . 


483 


2 


1624 


28 


4 
16 


2141 


El Sal. 


143 


— 


69 


5 


233 




l l ? 


2 


195 


22 


29 


360 


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Egypt 


67 
203 


38 


9 


— 


26 


140 


England 


48 


68 


88 


76 


483 


Estonia 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Finland 


12 


1 


4 


— 


19 


36 


Formosa 


13 


— 


5 


— 


1 


19 


France 


109 


9 


65 


29 


59 


271 


Germany 


85 


44 


124 


97 


140 


490 


Ghana 


— 


1 


2 


26 


58 


87 


Greece 


2082 


40 


111 


238 


558 


3695 


Guatemala 


244 


— 


64 


20 


3 


331 


Haiti 


972 


4 


5 


1 


— 


932 


Honduras 


448 


— 


17 


5 


4 


474 


Hong Kong 


64 


3 


22 


6 


14 


109 


Hungary 


43 


— 


11 


3 


27 


84 


Iceland 


2 


— 


— 


5 


— 


7 


India 


106 


69 


125 


49 


163 


512 


Indonesia 


9 


— 


r> 
O 


4 


6 


27 


Iran 


21 


— 


41 


4 


66 


132 


Iraq 


21 


16 


19 


4 


3 


63 


Ireland 


655 


31 


82 


42 


105 


915 


Israel 


46 


1 


13 


7 


17 


84 


Italy 


1024 


45 


635 


229 


635 


2568 



BOSTON 



FALL SPRING 

RIVER LAWRENCE FIELD 



WORCESTER TOTAL 



54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 
64. 
65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
74. 
75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 
83. 
84. 
85. 
86. 
87. 
88. 
89. 
90. 
91. 
92. 
93. 
94. 
95. 
96. 
97. 
98. 
99. 
100. 
101 
102. 
103. 



Jamaica^ 

Japan 

Jordon__ 

Kenya 

Korea 



1267 



41 



8 



80 



Latvia 

Lebanon_ 
Liber ia_ 
Libya 



35 



173 



41 



Lithuania 

Macau 

Hal ay a 

Mexico 



91 



101 



Montserrat_ 
Morocco 



182 



21 



47 



24 



Netherl ands 

ff. Zealand . 

Nicaragua 

No r w a y 

Other Countries 2 43 

P ak i s t an 4 

Palestine 

Panama 



14 



91 



Paraguay 

Peru 



17 



106 



Phil ippines 209 
Poland 1062 



Po r tug al 972 

Puerto Rico 159 
Romania 44 



Scotland 

So.Af rica_ 

Spain 

St. Lucia_ 

Sudan 

Sweden 



36 



12 



73 



15 



Switzerland 

Syrian 

Thailand 

Trinidad 

Turkey 

Ukraine 



19 



67 



31 



720 



166 



166 



25 



U.S.S.R.. 

Uruguay^ 

United StateslO 

Venezuela^ 

Vietnam _ 

Wales 

W. 



39 



20 



Indies 



204 



Yugoslavia 51 



TOTALS 



18,897 



17 



19 



37 



28 



32 



39 



159 



128 



3501 



19 



10 



262 



12 



5,116 



27 



389 



15 



16 



27 



21 



125 



136 



15 



666 



29 



11 



12 



12 



16 



18 



43 



10 



24 



8 



46 



33 



13 



74 



254 



142 



299 



124 



94 



22 



35 



34 



30 



27 



136 



25 



43 



64 



16 



21 



23 



8 



342 



430 



51 



13 



13 



8 



8,553 3,199 



59 



1759 



37 



128 



62 



45 



423 



24 



74 



38 



146 



49 



962 



195 



168 



376 



35 



42 



165 



150 
534 



2191 



4932 



297 



63 



151 



160 



25 



260 



91 



783 



392 



259 



3153 



144 



64 



232 



115 



5,893 41,658 



Page 1 



FALL SPRING 

BOSTON RIVER LAURENCE FIELD UORCESTER TOTAL 



LOCALITIES 



Fiscal Year 7/1/73 - 6/30/74 OFFICES - ALL OFFICES 



Abington 


13 


- 


— 


— 


2 


15 


Acton 


5 


— 


4 


— 


2 


11 


Adams 


7 


21 


— 


4 


— 


32 


Agawarn. 


1 


— 


— 


83 


. .. — 


84 


Amesbury 


18 


— 


8 


— . .. 


— 


26 


Amherst 


4 


— 


— 


23 


— 


27 


Andover 


24 


— . 


171 


— 


-j 


195 


Arlington 


127 


— 


44 


— 


4 


175 


Ashburnham 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Ashby 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


-L. 


Ashf ield 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Ashland 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Athol 


2 


— 


— 


— 


6 


8 


Attleboro 


11 


22 


— 


— 


— 


33 


Auburn 


1 


— 




- 


78 


79 


Avon 


7 


— 


— 


— 


- 


7 


Ayer 


24 


— 


17 


— 


74 


115 


Barnstable 


25 


31 


-■ • 


... 




56 


Barre 


— 


— 


— 


— 


32 


32 


Bedford 


13 


— 


2 


— 


— 


15 


Belchertown 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


4 


Bellingham 


3 


— 


— 


— 


1 


4 


Belmont 


114 


— 


2 


— 


3 


119 


Berlin 


■ — 


— 


— 


— 


8 


8 


Bernardston 


51 


— 


— 


— 


— 


51 


Beverly 


20 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 


Billerica 


— 


— 


43 


— 


— 


43 


Bla ckstone 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 



Boston 10,748 2 73 - 11 10,834 

Bourne 

Boxborough_ 
Boxford 



Boy 1 s ton z ~ I - 46 46 

Braintree 27 - m 1 - 28_ 

Bridgewater 31 2 = - z 33_ 

Brimfield 2 - - 3 5 



Brockton 215 18 3 - - 236 



Brookfield 7 - - 36 43 



Brookline 326 - 2 - - 328 



Burlington 25 - 1 - - 26 



Page 2 

PALL SPRING 

BOSTON RIVER LAURENCE FIELD WORCESTER TOTAL 



Cambridge 


1095 


- 


14 


- 


— 


1109 


Canton 


37 


— 


— 


— 


— 


37 


Carlisle 


1 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Carver 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


Charlton 


— 


— 


— 


— 


42 


42 


Chatham 


— 


5 


— 


— 


— 


5 


Chelmsford 


9 


— 


124 


— 


— 


133 


Chelsea 


483 


— 


— 


— 


— 


483 


Chicopee 


4 


— 


— 


360 


— 


364 


Clinton 


1 


— 


— 


— 


97 


98 


Concord 


11 


■— 


2 


— 


— 


13 


Danvers 


18 







Mi 




18 


Dartmouth 


1 


134 


— 


— 


- 


135 


Dedham 


56 


— 


— 


— 


— 


56 


Deerf ield 


>3V 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Dennis 


— 


7 


— 


— 


1 


8 


Dighton 


1 


5 


— 


— 


— 


6 


Dougl as 


- 


— 


— 


— 


27 


27 


Dover 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Dracut 


1 


— 


96 


— 


— 


97 


Dudl ey 


— ' 


— 


— 


— 


121 


121 


Dunstable 


- 


— 


14 


— 


— 


14 


Duxbury 


14 


— 


— 


- 


- 


14 



E. Bridgewate r 2 - - - 2^ 

E. Longmeado w - - - • ■ 19 - 19 

Easthampton 2 - 17 - 19 

E as ton !>■«-. - 1 

Everett 227 - - 227 



Pairhaven 9 100 - - - 109 

Fall Rive r 8 2904 - - - 2912 

Fal month 32 12 - - - 44 

Fitchburg 12 - - - 71 83 
Foxbo rough 6 - - - - 6 



Framingham 96 - - - 21 117 

Franklin 28 - 28 



Freetown - 28 - - 28 



Gardner 3 - - -. 1 70) 79 

Georgetown 1 - 4 ' - - 5 



Gilbertville - - 3 - __5 8 

Gloucester 38 - '" - _ 38 



Page 3 



BOSTON 



FALL 
RIVER 



LAURENCE 



SPRING 
FIELD 



WORCESTER TOTAL 



Goshen 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Grafton 


— 


— 


— 


— 


67 


67 


Granby 


— 


- 


— 


8 


— 


8 


Granville 


1 


— 


— 


2 


— 


3 


Greenfield 


1 


— 


— 


10 


— 


11 


Grovel and' 


8 


— 


— 


— 


— 


8 


Hadley 


• 






1 




1 


Halifax 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Hamilton 


1 


^~ 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Hampden 


1 


— 


— 


2 


— 


3 


Hanson 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Harvard 


3 


— 


' — 


— 


— 


3 


Hatfield 


— 


— " 




7 


— 


7 


Haverhill 


14 


— 


506 


— . 


- 


520 


Hingham 


3 


— 


— 


— 


- 


3 


Holbrook 


17 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


Hoi den 


— 


— 


m. 


— 


83 


88 


Holliston 


10 


— 


— 


— 


3 


13 


Holyoke 


6 


— 


— 


181 


— 


137 


Hopkinton 


1 


— 


— 


— 


22 


23 


Hubbardston 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


Hudson 


12 


— 


2 


— 


68 


82 


Hull 


4 


- 


- 


— 


— 


4 



Ipswich 



Kingston 



13 



13 



Lancaster_ 

Lawrence 

Lee 



Leicester_ 
Lenox: 



Leominster 

Lexington 

Lincoln 



Littleton___ 
Longmeadow_ 

Lowell 

Ludlow 



56 



44 



34 



126 



4284 



48 



1775 



101 



48 



48 



126 



4340 



48 



51 



49 



10 



57 



1809 



102 



Page 4 



t 



FALL ' 'SPRING 
BOSTON RIVER LAWRENCE FIELD WORCESTER TOTAL 



Lynn 


473 




32 


— 


— 


505 


Lynnf ield 


2 


— 


5 


— 


— 


7 


- • - _ 


172 












Maiden 






172 


Manchester 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Mansfield 


4 


4 


— 


— 


— 


8 


Marblehead 


26 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


Marion 


10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10 


Marlborough 


35 


— 


— 


— 


39 


74 


Mar shf ield 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


Mattapoisett 


— 


3 


— 


— 


— 


8 


Maynard 


3 


— 


1 


_ 


8 


12 


Medford 


164 


— 


.38. 


— 


— 


202 


Medway 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Melrose 


29 


— 


.. 26 


— 


— 


55 


Merrimac 


— 


— 


14 


- • — 


— 


14 


Methuen 


1 


— 


367 


— 


— 


368 


Middl ebo rough 


1 


5 


— 


— 


— 


6 


Middle ton 


1 


— 


5 


— 


— 


6 


Milford 


14 


— 


3 


— .- 


98 


115 


Millburv 


_ _ 


„ , 




_ 


48 


48 



Millis 

Millville 

Milton 

Monroe 

Monson 




Nahant 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


Natick 


32 


— 


— 


— 


— 


32 


Needham 


14 


— 


3 


— 


— 


17 


New Bedford 


23 


1329 


— 


— 


— 


1352 


New Braintree 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


7 


New Salem 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


6 


Newbury 


— 


— 


6 


— 


— 


6 


Newburyport 


1 


— 


8 


— 


— 


9 


Newton 


260 


— 


4 


— 


1 


265 


Norfolk 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Nn, Anrfnver 


1 


— 


95 


— 


— 


96 


No . A t tl ebo r o ugh 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


No. Brookfield 


— 


- 


— 


— 


18 


18 


No. Reading 


1 


- 


13 


— 


— 


14 


North Hampton 


4 


— 


— 


45 


1 


50 


No rthbo rough 


9 


— 


— 


— 


104 


113 


Northbridge 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29 


29 



Northfield__ 

No r ton 11 4 '- - - 1_5_ 

Norwood 87 - - - 4 91 



Page 5 



FALL SPRING 

BOSTON RIVER LAWRENCE FIELD WORCESTER TOTAL 



Orange 


— 


. - 


- 


- 


39 


39 


Orleans 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


Otis 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Oxford 


— 


— 


— 


— 


45 


45 


Palmer 








t 

13 




13 


Paxton 


■ — 


— 


— 


— 


24 


24 


Peabody 


244 . 


— . 


23 


— 


ym 


267 


Pembroke 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


Pepper ell 


— 


— 


8 


— 


— 


8 


Petersham 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


26 


Pittsf ield 


— 


— 


— 


15 


— 


15 


Plainville 


1 


— 


— 


.— 


— 


1 


Plymouth 


12 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12 


Plymton 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Princeton 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


9 


Provincetown 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Randolph 


32 










32 


Ray ham 


4 


10 


— 


— 


— 


14 


Reading 


13 


— 


6 


— 


- 


19 


Revere 


108 


— 


— 


— 


— 


108 


Rockland 


25 


— 


— 


— 


— 


25 


Rockport 


3 


— 


1 


— 


. — 


4 


Rutland 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30 


30 


Quincy 


302 




4 






306 


Salem 


142 


• : 


27 






169 


Salisbury 


— ' 


— 


29 


— 


— 


29 


Sandwich 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Saugus 


17 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


Scituate 


51 


— 


— 


— 


— 


51 


Seekonk 


— 


6 


— 


— 


— 


6 


Sharon 


20 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 


Sheffield 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Sherborn 


6 


- 


— 


— 




6 


Shirley 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18 


18 


Shrewsbury 


— 


— 


— 


— 


192 


192 


Shutesbury 


— • 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Somerset 


15 


227 


— 


— 


— 


242 


Somerville 


668 


— 


18 


— 


— 


686 


So. Berlin 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


So. Hadley 


- 


— 


- 


54 


— 


54 



Page 6 



FALL SPRING 

BOSTON RIVER LAWRENCE FIELD WORCESTER TOTAL 



Southampton 


— 


— 


— ■ " 


1 


- 


1 


Southborough 


1 


— 


— 


— 


4 


5 


Southbridge 


25 


— 


— 


— 


165 


190 


Southwick 


— 


— 


— 


17 


— 


17 


Spencer 


— 


— 


— 


— 


48 


48 


Springfield 


10 


— 


3 


1806 


— 


1819 


Sterling 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30 


30 


Stockbridge 


— 


. — 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Stoneham 


53 


— 


31 


— 


— 


84 


Stoughton 


37 


— 




— 


— 


37 


Stow 


2 


— 


— . 


— 


— ,- 


2 


Sturbridge 


— 


— 


— ■ 


— 


25 


25 


Sudbury 


12 


— . 


— 


— 


5 


17 


Sunderland 


1 


— 


1 


Sutton 


— 


— 


— 


— 


16 


16 


Swampscott 


18 


— 


— 


— 


- 


18 


Swansea 


1 


98 


— 


— 


— 


99 


Taunton 


7 


57 


4 






68 


Tewksbury 


21 


— 


44 


— 


— 


65 


Topsf ield 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


Towns end 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Tyingsborough 


— 


— 


7 


— 


— 


7 


Upton 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


7 


7 


Uxferidge 


1 


- 


— 


— 


44 


45 



W ak ef i el d 47 - 78 - - 125 

Wales ' - _ ^ _ 3 



Walpole 77 - - '-■«,..'" _ 77 



Waltham 171 - n _ 183 



Ware - - - 8 43 51 



Wareham L-. SJ - - _ 10 



Warren ~ - - 4 14 18 



Watertown 399 -__ 9 - 3 4H 

Wayl and 10 Z Z 10" 



Webster 2 - - 187 "T89" 

Wellesley 46" Z io T" J 57" 

VJellfleet 10 - - . . Z 10 

Wenham - - 2 ■ Z ' "Z 5* 



W. Boylston - - -_ 37 "37" 

VJest Brookfiel d - - _ J7 pf 

VJest Newbury - - 4 I " Z ~ 



Page 7 



W. Springfield 


BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING 
FIELD 

113 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
113 


Westborougn 


1 


— 


— 


— 


67 


68 


Westf ield 


3 


— 


— 


145 


— 


148 


Westford 


12 


— 


25 


— 


— 


37 


Weston 


12 


— 


2 


— 


— 


14 


Westport 


— 


68 


— 


— 


— 


68 


Westwood 


17 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


Weymouth 


52 


— 


8 


— 


— 


60 


Whitinsville 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


9 


Whitman 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


Wilbraham 


1 


— 


— 


21 


— 


22 


Williams town 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


4 


Wilmington 


10 


— 


3 


— 


— 


13 


Winchester 


39 


— 


— 


— 


— 


39 


Winthrop 


26 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


Wo burn 


71 


— 


13 


— 


1 


85 


Worcester 


22 


— 


4 


— 


3154 


3180 


Wrentham 


4 


— 


- 


- 


— 


4 


Yarmouth 


10 








4 


14 



Out of State 



235 



352 



49 



638 



TOTALS 



18,897 



5,116 



8,553 



3,199 



5,893 



41,658